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Health Care Advice

Advice on vaccinations, worming and neutering your pet

Advice from our veterinary team on how to prepare and support your pet through recieving vaccinations and the correct worming treatments. Along with deciding when or if to neuter your pet. 

Vaccinations

Kittens: First vaccination from 9 weeks followed by a second vaccination 3 weeks later. Immunity not till 5-7 days after 2 nd injection. Then they have a yearly booster, which we will send a reminder for. Cats can be vaccinated for cat flu (Herpes virus and Calici virus) feline Panleukopaenia (which causes diarrohea) and fline Leukaemia virus.

Puppies:  Vaccinated from 8 weeks of age then 10 weeks and a repeated parvo at 16 weeks. Immunity 5-7 days after the 2nd injection. So we advise that your puppy is not allowed down on the floor in public areas till then. Then they have a yearly booster, which we send a reminder for.

Dogs: Vaccinated for Distemper, Parvovirus, Adenovirus, Para-influenza, Canine infectious hepatitis and 2 types of leptospirosis. There is also a vaccine for Kennel cough. This needs to be given intranasally. Immunity lasts 1 year.

Rabbits: Single yearly vaccinations against myxomatosis (from 6 weeks old) And viral haemorrhagic disease (from 12 weeks old).  Vaccinations against the two must be given separately and 2 weeks apart.

Ferrets: Single yearly vaccinations against distemper only. A special vaccine is required so please check when booking appointment that the vaccine is in stock.

Worming

Puppies and Kittens: Start worming from 2 weeks of age. Worm every 2 weeks till 12 weeks old, then every month till 6 months.

Pregnant or lactating bitches: Worm from the 42nd day of pregnancy every day until 2 weeks after the birth. 
This regime prevents the newborn puppies being born with worms.

Adult dogs: Worm every 3 months.

Adult cats: ( including pregnant queens) Worm every 3 months.

Your pet needs to have been seen within a year for some worming treatments

Neutering

Ovariohysterectomy (spay)
In most cases animals are spayed in order to control oestrus cycles and prevent unwanted litters. We can also perform an ovariohysterectomy to help prevent your pet from developing mammary tumours and uterine infections. We would recommend that you let your female dog have their first season. Following this a bitch can be spayed 3months after a season or 6-8 weeks after giving birth.

The female cat (Queen) comes into oestrus every 3 weeks during their breeding season which is usually during the warmer months of the year. This may mean it is difficult to find a time when she is not in season. The veterinary surgeon may suggest that they can be spayed at the onset of sexual maturity (around 5mths).

In the bitch, the surgery is usually carried out via the mid line. In the cat it is usually performed flank on their left side. In both cases their ovaries, uterine horns and uterine body are removed.

Postoperative care:

  • Both animals should be kept quiet for the first couple of days after surgery.
  • The bitch should be restricted to lead exercise until the stitches are removed.
  • The cat should be kept indoors until the wound has started to heal properly. 
  • Animals have a tendency to put on weight after being neutered.
  • The wounds should be monitored for signs of swelling, bleeding and oozing, also your pet should be discouraged from licking at it. 

Orchidectomy (Castration)
By having your pet castrated it can help with roaming and male behaviour traits such as spraying in tom cats, or aggression. More often it is used to prevent breeding and the development of testicular tumours and prostate cancer.

Castration involves the surgical removal of both testes. This is a simpler procedure than spaying as they are more accessible. If the testes are retained they should still be removed to prevent all of the above but the procedure can be more difficult.

In dogs the incision is made just in front of the scrotum and the testes are removed through this. In cats it is made through each scrotal sac and they are usually left open to heal.

Postoperative care:

  • Both animals should be kept quiet for the first couple of days. 
  • Cats should be kept indoors for 24hours for you to monitor.
  • The wound should be monitored for swelling, bleeding and oozing, also your pet should be discouraged from licking at it. 
  • Dogs should be kept on the lead until the stitches are removed or the veterinary surgeon gives the go ahead. 

Rabbits
Two entire male rabbits (bucks) kept together may fight and can be castrated from 12 weeks. A period of 2 weeks should be allowed before the buck is returned to female. A doe can be spayed from 4-5months. Spaying is recommended to prevent against uterine cancer and can make the doe friendlier.

Postoperative care:

  • The hutch should be kept in a warm place, they may have to come inside.
  • It is very important to encourage your rabbit to eat.
  • If they have not eaten by the following day please contact the surgery. 
  • Bedding should be kept clean, the wound should be monitored for swelling, bleeding and oozing, also your pet should be discouraged from licking at it.

Guinea pigs and chinchillas
The females are rarely spayed. Males can be castrated from 3 months of age, and should be separated from the female for 2 weeks after wards

Postoperative care:

  • The hutch should be kept in a warm place, they may have to come inside, food and water to be given, bedding should be kept clean. 
  • The wound should be monitored for swelling, bleeding and oozing, also your pet should be discouraged from licking at it.
Animals have a tendency to put on weight after being neutered. We always advise to monitor your pet’s food intake and may be reduce their food.

Practice information

Clarendon Veterinary Centre

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  • Mon
    8:30am - 7:30pm
  • Tue
    8:30am - 7:00pm
  • Wed
    8:30am - 7:00pm
  • Thu
    8:30am - 7:00pm
  • Fri
    8:30am - 7:00pm
  • Sat
    8:45am - 12:30pm
  • Sun
    Closed
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2 Clarendon Road, Weston-super-Mare, North Somerset, BS23 3EF
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